Tweet Your Story

 

I once wrote a blog post entitled “For Sale: Baby Shoes, Never Worn.” It was about Six Word Stories, and a few blog readers came up with some good ones of their own. Other than that post I’ve never done anything more with the subject of flash fiction.

I was trolling Twitter recently and came up with a few things to pass along.

ShareAStory InOneTweet

Here are two of my favorite examples from #ShareAStoryInOneTweet, where all the stories have a medical theme:

From AbbersMD:

U collapsed at work (Home Depot).. u were dead when my ambulance arrived. I got u back. U have no idea who I am. I visited Home Depot just to see u during my darkest hours in medical school… ur a reminder that I can do it You saved me back.

U collapsed at work (Home Depot).. u were dead when my ambulance arrived. I got u back. U have no idea who I am. I visited Home Depot just to see u during my darkest hours in medical school… ur a reminder that I can do it You saved me back.

From Ali S. Raja, MD :

You: Student nurse who asked me to come to bed 24 to help you clean up a geriatric patient who had soiled herself, just to see if I would.

Me: Intern who took one look at you and ran right over. 14 years later, we still laugh when people ask us how we met.

Serious Flash Fiction

Serious Flash Fiction’s contest is open to anyone, with no restrictions as to genre or theme. Write a 269-character story, end it with #SFFiction, and submit it by June 23rd. The best entries will be published in an anthology.

Onward

Onward, the literary zine of English Department students at Universitas Padjadjaran (that’s in Indonesia), is currently inviting six-word-story tweets. Send them to #SWOnward.

Can you write a story in 269 characters? Or write a six-word story? Tweet it and post it in a comment here. I’d also like to hear about other flash fiction opportunities.

Quotable

Your intuition knows what to write, so get out of the way.

–Ray Bradbury

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Tweet Your Story

  1. Robbie Shapard
    “After School”

    The father I rented wasn’t what I expected, alcohol on his breath, late to pick me up after practice. So what, he said, you think you’re better than me? I slipped him an extra $5.

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