Tag Archives: adverbs

Lose Those Adverbs–or Not

Last week’s post included a quote from Samuel Johnson: “When a man knows he will be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.”

Wonderfully?  Wait a minute. That’s an adverb. Every writer learns that adverbs are a no-no. “Search for all the ‘ly’ endings in your manuscript, and purge them. ” So goes the advice.

Stephen King has a vendetta for adverbs.  In On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, he says,  “I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs, and I will shout it from the rooftops. To put it another way, they’re like dandelions. If you have one on your lawn, it looks pretty and unique. If you fail to root it out, however, you find five the next day . . . fifty the day after that . . . and then, my brothers and sisters, your lawn is totally, completely, and profligately covered with dandelions. By then you see them for the weeds they really are, but by then it’s–GASP!!–too late.”

Truth to tell, I’m not afraid to use adverbs. I do try to write with strong verbs, e.g., “he  shuffled” instead of “he slowly walked.” And my friend and writing buddy Gaylon Greer points out that if an adverb is needed, moving it so it follows what it modifies can boost the impact.

I’ve thought about Johnson’s quote, and for the life of me I can’t imagine it without the word wonderfully or with that word placed anywhere else in the sentence.

What do you think? Can you improve on the quote without using an adverb? Leave a comment.

Sharpen Your Pencils

NaNoWriMo begins tomorrow.